Tag: Mustang II

1953 Studebaker Pickup with a Welder Series Mustang II Crossmember

Dear Welder Series… 1953 Studebaker PU Mustang II

Dear Welder Series…
I want to purchase a coil spring front cross member kit. It is going into a 53 International with a stock tread width of 60-1/2″. Questions …. I have Granada rotors on MII spindles … do I need the 58″ or 60″ x-member? The frame width is 28-1/4″ out to out  …. which size will work best?I have seen the Swartz build, but can find no reference to which width he used.

Dear Rich…
Rich, I’m checking with Grant Schwartz now.
To decide the track width kit to use, position the wheels and tires that you’ll use in the fender opening and measure wheel mounting surface to surface.
28-1/4” outside dimension might require a work-around, but let’s take one step at a time.
Thanks for looking at Welder Series’ parts. Paul Horton

Dear Welder Series…
Here are the measurements for the frame. The outside measurement is 28-1/4″ from 6″ ahead of Z to 1″ behind Z then tapers to 28-7/8″ at 6″ behind Z.

Dear Rich…
Installation tips and cut lines drawings are attached.
Paul

Dear Welder Series…
I will take pictures as I go and will send you a file when the frame is done…. might be a month or so at the rate this old fart works….. and have to keep the house projects going to keep the boss happy. A Jag rear is the next stage of the project.
This project is replacing my daily driver as it has seen 12 years and a lot of abuse.  Engine is 5 cylinder M/B turbo and is still going strong. 

Dear Welder Series: 1929 Essex Mustang II Install

Welder Series offers a service where we can guide you where to cut the crossmember after you provide some key dimensions. Here’s how it works…

Mustang II Crossmember Trim Lines Worksheet

Dear Welder Series…

Hi Paul. Prior to me cutting the notches in my clip, could you have a quick look and see if it will work. I think this ok but….. Its on a 29 Essex no fender, with 2″ drop spindles. Frame width is 24″ inside and 28″ out side, Frame is 2″ wide and 2-3/4 ” high

Thanks John

Dear John… Good morning, John.

I’m working on your Mustang II cut lines and realized I didn’t ask some questions yesterday:

Are the frame rails parallel?  (28” & 24” from 5” ahead to 5” back from centerline)  If not, what are the dimensions at those points?

You said the rails are 2-3/4” high at axle centerline.  What is the frame rail height 5” ahead and 5” back from c/l?

Thanks.

Paul

Dear Welder Series…

Hi Paul
The frame rails are parallel. The frame rail height 5″ ahead is c/l is 2-3/4″ and 5″ back of c/l is 3-1/8″.
When fitting the cross member last night I had to grind a little more get it to fit . In my picture to you I had the depth of the cut at 2.5″, when it is now 2-3/4 ”

Thanks so much for your help !!!!

Cheers John

Dear John…

Hi, John.

Here are the cut lines to put the bottom of your frame 10-1/2” from the ground with dropped spindles and a 26” diameter tire.

Please send pictures when you get the kit installed.
Thanks for using Welder Series’ parts.
Paul Horton

Dear Welder Series…

Hi Paul
Please see attached pictures of the 1929 Three Window Essex Coupe 🙂
Thanks for all your help !!! Soon to be chopped and channeled.
Kind regards John

Mustang II Crossmember Trim Lines Worksheet

Welder Series has a free service to help builders lay out the crossmember and upper tower cut lines. If you fill them out, take pictures of them, and email the pages back to us, we will give you drawings showing the sections to be removed. These worksheets can also give us the info we need to provide you with boxing plates. We’d give you a price for the plates and you can decide if you want to order them or make your own.

MII frame dimension tech sheet

Dear Welder Series… MII for Datsun 521?

Dear Welder Series…
Hello, I was looking at your Mustang II crossmember kit. I’d like to get one for my Datsun 521. I was wondering if you would be able to decrease the width of the crossmember sections by 3” to accommodate the more narrow track width of my truck. I guess I could section it myself but that wouldn’t look as clean. The suspension parts aren’t readily available for my truck so I’d like to use this setup.
Thanks,
John

Dear John…
Hi, John.

We can make special width crossmembers, but…
The actual track width might not turn out to be what you hoped for. The brake kit used can move the wheel in or out from where the stock Mustang II was. You might also find that narrow control arms can be used that will reduce the track width and give more clearance in the engine room for exhaust and steering, even if you will use the stock engine.
Our website has some Mustang II dimensions at http://welderseries.com/tech/tech-sharing/ifs-make-your-own/. These dims will give a track width of 56-1/2” when stock 1974-78 Mustang II rotors and control arms are used. Narrowing the dimensions, top and bottom, will bring the wheels closer together by that amount. Shorter control arms will do the same. The brakes used might move the wheels in or out. We have info about our brake kits at:
If you use 4-bolt MII rotors, there should be no change.
My suggestion is:
Get everything you need except the crossmember kit, springs, shocks, and the steering rack. (Wheels & tires, brakes, spindles, and control arms)  A custom rack will have to be ordered after the width has been determined. Springs and shocks can come after that.
Remove the stock front suspension.
Block the truck at ride height.
Mock up the wheels & tires, rotors, spindles and lower control arms.
Position the tires in the fender. The tires should be very close the vertical.
Block the lower control arms at horizontal.
Measure the lower control arm mounting hole center-to-center.
Subtract that dimension from 22-1/4”. This is the amount to remove from the crossmember.
Buy our 56-1/2” kit and remove that amount from between the rack mounts.
The rack will have to be shortened the same amount.
Before doing much more, check the cost of this to be sure you are comfortable with it.
I hope this helps with this part of the project.
Paul Horton
Dear Welder Series…
Paul,

Thank you for all the information and help. I figured that the control arms would have to be shortened as well. I saw a couple of your customers vehicles who did the same thing. Have a Happy New Year.
Johnathon

Dear Welder Series… Mustang II for a 37 Dodge?

Dear Welder Series…
Good Day. Looking for a Mustang 2 type cross member for a 37 Dodge D5 coupe. Can’t find anything on your site. Would you have such a thing? Price and how much to ship to A0L 1A0? Thanks Gary

Dear Gary…
Hi, Gary. Your Dodge frame has a high curve over the front axle which makes it more difficult to install a Mustang II front end. It would be good to read our instruction sheets. https://shared-assets.adobe.com/link/17afad9a-b219-4191-7cfb-7ee4bfa6277c/?file=Coil%20Spring%20Mustang%20II.pdf , and eye-ball “ambush” areas. It might be necessary to add to the bottom of your frame to mount the crossmember and then trim off the top of the frame to mount the upper towers. The kit you use will depend on the track width you want and if you plan to use stock-style springs and shocks or coil-overs. Thanks for looking at Welder Series parts. Once you decide on the kit you’d like, we can dial in the freight cost.

Paul Horton

Dear Welder Series…
Hi Paul Thanks for your informative reply. I will have a closer look at what I have and go from there. Now I said Mustang II front end, but it doesn’t have to be. Is there something else that would an easier install using the stock rails? Gary

Dear Gary…
Hi, Gary. A nice thing about the Mustang II is that new parts are readily available. Coil springs and coil overs are available with a wide range of rates so that the front end gets installed knowing that the ride height and the ride quality you want will happen when the vehicle is finished. Another advantage is that most, often all, sheet metal, bumper, and rad mounting holes can be used because the MII gets installed in the stock frame. I hope this info helps.

Paul Horton

Dear Welder Series… 1937 Dodge D5 Mustang II?

Dear Welder Series…
Looking for a Mustang 2 type cross member for a 37 Dodge D5 coupe. Can’t find anything on your site. Would you have such a thing? Price and how much to ship to A0L 1A0?

Dear Gary…
Your Dodge frame has a high curve over the front axle which makes it more difficult to install a Mustang II front end. It would be good to read our instruction sheets. https://shared-assets.adobe.com/link/17afad9a-b219-4191-7cfb-7ee4bfa6277c/?file=Coil%20Spring%20Mustang%20II.pdf , and eye-ball “ambush” areas. It might be necessary to add to the bottom of your frame to mount the crossmember and then trim off the top of the frame to mount the upper towers.
The kit you use will depend on the track width you want and if you plan to use stock-style springs and shocks or coil-overs.
Thanks for looking at Welder Series parts. Once you decide on the kit you’d like, we can dial in the freight cost.
Paul Horton

Dear Welder Series…
Thanks for your informative reply. I will have a closer look at what I have and go from there. Now I said Mustang II front end, but it doesn’t have to be. Is there something else that would an easier install using the stock rails?
Gary

Dear Gary…
A nice thing about the Mustang II is that new parts are readily available. Coil springs and coil overs are available with a wide range of rates so that the front end gets installed knowing that the ride height and the ride quality you want will happen when the vehicle is finished.
Another advantage is that most, often all, sheet metal, bumper, and rad mounting holes can be used because the MII gets installed in the stock frame.
I hope this info helps.

Paul Horton


Dear Welder Series… 1965 Lincoln Mustang II?

Dear Welder Series…
Would you have a Mustang 2 crossmember solution for my problem. My frame rails curve inward and gets narrow at the crossmember/motor mount location so I would require a crossmember of about 24” wide between the car’s frame. The problem is my track width is 62”. Available Mustang 2 crossmember kits that measure 24” typically have a track width of only about 56”.  
Do you have any ideas on how I can retrofit a Mustang 2 crossmember kit into my ‘65 Lincoln short of having to replace the frame with straight pieces to get rid of narrow the section? Would longer upper & lower control arms and a longer top hat be a good option for providing a wider track for a narrow crossmember?
Please Advise, Thanks!Gilbert

Dear Gilbert…
I think you should consider adding straight sections of plate steel to make the frame wider in the crossmember/upper tower area. This would be top, bottom and outside pieces to give an outside dimension of 35 – 36”. Then trim the stock frame inside the new pieces and add the fourth side. Now the crossmember can be mounted under and inside the frame and the towers can weld on top and outside. There are some pictures in the Mustang II section of our website showing frame pieces in stock frames. It is not an easy job.
The longer control arms would require a special rack and this could start a whole new set of things to adapt to.
Thanks for asking us about this.Paul Horton

Dear Welder Series…
Thanks for the recommendation and quick response! You confirmed what I was dreading, the frame has to be modified. 
I apologize if this sounds ignorant but to exhaust the other option, could longer tie rods/ends (approximately 3” longer each side) be used on the steering rack to accommodate the longer control arms? Or would this throw off other steering parameters?
Appreciate the advice,Gilbert

Dear Welder Series… 1951 Merc Mustang II?

Dear Welder Series…
Hi Paul
Building a 51 Merc do you have know which width will work best, also I don’t see it listed but do you have an already or mostly welded kit?
Thanks

Dear Jeremy…
Jeremy, if your Mercury is a pickup (M1), use our F1 Mustang II kit or our 60-1/2” custom fit kit. You can also use our kits for coil-overs. If your Mercury is a passenger car, it will be necessary to modify the front frame section to install the Mustang II crossmember. Check the thumbnail pics on our website and read our instruction sheets while you look at your car’s frame.

April 2018 Photo Sharing

Thanks to everyone who sent in pictures of how Welder Series products are being used on your projects through the month of April. Hopefully these will spark an idea that you can use on your own project! See below the gallery for links to products shown. The winner (chosen at random by random.org) has been notified and a $50 credit has been applied!

Submit your own pictures here.

Dear Welder Series… 1957 F100 Mustang II

Dear Welder Series…
I’m building a 1957 F100, and would like to use some of your products, but I have a few questions.

I want to use your mustang 2 crossmember with coil overs, but I’m wanting to set the ride height of the truck pretty low, so clearance for wheels in turning becomes a concern. Would I be better off using your middle width m2 crossmember, and modify my frame, to pull the wheels in a bit? I also don’t have the wheels I’m planning to use, as I’m not quite sure what to order on backspacing. Any suggestions for that?

Thanks,
Shane

Dear Shane…
Hi, Shane. Thanks for asking but I’m not sure that I’ll be much help. Back when we built customer projects, we used 60-1/2” kits and 7” wide wheels. There was always lots of clearance.

Because you don’t have the wheels/tires, I’d suggest working on other areas of the project until you have had time to check out more vehicles at events to see what’s been used and how that was managed.

Thanks for looking at Welder Series parts.
Paul Horton

1956 International Pickup Mustang II

Grant Schwartz stopped in the other day to pick up a Mustang II crossmember, and I think he had it installed quicker than my kids can go through a jar of Elmira maple syrup.

Here are some pictures he took. To see more of Grant’s work, please visit and follow his Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/schwartz.inc

Parts Used:

 
 

Dear Welder Series… 1949 International kb1 Mustang II

Dear Welder Series…
I have a 1949 international kb1. I would like to use coil springs and the mustang 2. I think it would take the 60 inch track. Is this correct? What would be the total cost shipped to Winnipeg? Do you offer welding of the basic member? Thanks

Dear Paul,
Paul, There are 2 frames for KB1’s, according to my info, 28” and 30” outside width. With either of these frames, I’d widen the frame outside dimension by adding tubing so the 60” kit has more frame surface to weld to. Read through the installation sheets here and I think you’ll see what I mean. (30” frame outside doesn’t give any surface on top of the frame for the upper tower to weld to in the 60″ kit.)

Here is a link to the web store page for the Mustang II:

There are other parts there that you might need, too, and some videos.

The 60-1/2” kit, welded, including freight and sales tax would total C$346.50.  (That’s Canadian Dollars…)

Thanks for looking at Welder Series parts for your project.
Paul Horton

 

D100: Rack Extensions

Here’s a quick bit of info on how we matched the rack to our 62-1/2″ Mustang II crossmember.

Theoretically, you could widen a Mustang II crossmember as much as you wanted… the key is protecting the control arm pivot points and tie rod geometry. When you’re thinking of widening a Mustang II rack, there are two ways to do it properly… outside the bushings and inside the bushings.
‘Outside the bushings’ refers to pushing the tie rod ball and socket joint towards the wheel. This has to be done the same amount as the crossmember is wider than stock – typically 2″ per side on a 4″ wider than stock configuration. Longer tie rod ends can also be used on a 58″ wide crossmember.
‘Inside the bushings’ refers to lengthening the actual rack and rack housing. For a much wider crossmember, this might be a good option… there are even racks available that are wider than stock for this purpose. Your crossmember will have to be set up or modified for a wider rack. Welder Series crossmembers are designed to use rack extenders – the ‘outside the bushing’ method.

On my 1968 D100 truck build, I used a Welder Series 62-1/2″ track width crossmember, with rack extenders from Heidts. I used two (4″ total) on the passenger side, and one (2″ total) on the driver side. Our rack mounts favor the driver side, so the steering input shaft is closer to the frame rail and will be more likely to be aimed away from your headers.

Note: the rack bushings mount with the shoulder against the crossmember, and the serrations biting in to the rack mounts. Use a bolt size washer (included in our #24410 power rack mounting kit) on the front of the bushing, and let the bushing mushroom as you tighten the nut.