Category: Shop Truck

Progress highlights of our 68 Dodge D100 build.

D100 Seat: Update 2

After selecting the fabric from the LeBaron Bonney catalog (direct link) and giving Peter an admittedly vague description of what I was thinking for the seat, I had to accomplish one of the most difficult tasks in building a project: waiting.

Tack Upholstery

I have complete confidence in Peter’s ability to interpret my muddled attempts at describing a finished product, so there was no stress over that. I was more worried about the fabric, since I was the one who picked it, not heeding the advice of even my wife who has an uncanny ability to see color. She has chosen the EXACT color swatch sample from Home Depot three times over a period of about five years. Color doesn’t initially register as an adjective when I’m first looking at a car, for example. Anyways, this seat is AMAZING. Peter used the stock frame which was supplied with the truck (the seat that came installed was from a 1970 Fury 4 door). He refinished, painted, fixed the springs, added new foam… and kept the fabric aligned perfectly. I know it looks a bit purple in the pictures, but it’s actually a nice deep blue.

This is a nice step forward… I can make vroom vroom noises now!

D100 Build, Article 4: Rear Bump Stops

I always appreciate a good “reusal” of parts to either change their intended function, or to keep their original function but in a slightly different way. Using body trim tastefully from one model on a different car comes to mind. The reused part needs to fit the theme, however, and not merely look like it was used because it was 8:45 on a Sunday night, and the auto parts store workers were on strike.

In removing the original leaf spring rear suspension on the Sweptline, I ended up taking the bump stops off the frame too. They weren’t lined up with axle centerline, and I decided I could use the space outside the rails where they were sticking out. Also, they were going to be in the space I needed to remove for step notch clearance. I like the piece itself; just not where it was mounted.

After the notches were installed, I started to think about bump stops and remembered I still had the originals, so I cleaned them up, made a few tweaks, and present them to you now!

I won’t be installing them until I have the truck sitting with the Shockwaves fully collapsed so I know where it actually needs to be. They’ll be welded to the inside of the frame rails on the step notch.

If you need new bump stops, Energy Suspension has a bunch of options. Check out this reseller’s listing (I find it easier to search than the official website): http://www.energysuspensionparts.com/universal-bump-stops-shock-eyes.asp

D100 Build, Article 3: rear axle centerline/ disassembly

With a wheel opening that’s not three sides of a perfect square, you’re going to have to spend some time deciding what looks right to you. When you’re installing a new rear suspension, you have the ability to fine tune the wheel location, and fine tune you should. Look how the gap ahead of the tire opens up substantially in the first picture. This is why it’s important to have at the very least the diameter of the tires you’ll be using. If I was using a shorter tire, it might look better a little closer to the ground, for instance. Have a look at the pictures and let me know if you agree with our determined wheel centerline.