Dear Welder Series… what tie rod ends with 60″ MII?

Dear Welder Series…
When using the MII cross member, what tie rod ends are used on the 60″ track width?

Dear Robert…
Robert, it’s best to use rack extenders, but Fairmont tie rod ends can be used. The rack extenders are available from street rod companies that sell racks. They extend the center of the rack at each end. There are different thread pitches on Mustang racks, so I suggest getting the rack and extenders from the same company at the same time. Have 2″ extenders put on each end of the rack.

Paul Horton

Dear Welder Series…
Question on the triangulated 4 link. I will be ordering the triangulated kit to us on my 8.8 going in my 57 F100. I’m going to order the rear first to see what kind of stance the truck has with a straight axle. I would like to do the MII front end but the vin # is stamped right where the upper brackets would go and I can’t cover that. My question is, do all 4 bars have to be level? Ride height is an unknown till the axle is in. Will anything be affected by having the bars angled?

Dear Robert…
Robert, the installation tips are at https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/26254738/Instructions/318500IN.pdf . These are the instructions for the regular and 8.8 4-link. If your 8.8 is from a Mustang, order the 8.8 kit. If your 8.8 is from a leaf spring vehicle, order the regular kit. The bars do not have to be level. There is some tolerance with the mounting points, too.

A comment regarding ride height: We always build so the finished project is at the ride height we want. This is easier to do with coil-overs or air bags than with leaf springs. Ride height clearance over the rear end can be 3″. It might be necessary to c-notch the frame if the ride height you want puts the bottom of the stock rail too close above the axle tube. Make sure there is clearance between the top of the differential housing and the bed floor when the suspension is fully compressed.

The ride height with the stock front suspension should be fairly easy to establish. Then you can stand back and see if the truck is sitting the way you want. If it isn’t, make changes so it will. This will take more time, and maybe more money up front, but you will be happier with the finished product.

I hope this helps with your planning.

Paul Horton

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