Dear Welder Series… 67 Mustang MII, 61 Falcon MII, grinner

Dear Welder Series…

I am looking for a crossmember kit to put in my 67 mustang I need to know which one to order for my application?.?. I was looking at your flats do these require forming? If so do they come with fab prints? I was also wondering if these are made from a-36 and are they laser or plasma burnt?  thanks in advance,  mark

Mark, the 56″ kit is the one to use on your Mustang.
The main crossmember plates (there are two of them in a kit) have laser-cut slits that go through the steel.  There are 3 “bridges” that hold the part together.  The slit makes it possible (and easy) to fold the crossmember pieces by hand.  The rack mounts are part of the main crossmember, so they will be in the right location when the crossmember is assembled.  The rack mounts are designed with laser-cut slits and can be folded without anything more than an adjustable wrench, too.  There is a video showing this at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FoYOYT1iZTY .  Our crossmembers are laser cut from 44W or A569 steel.

Thanks for asking.
Paul Horton

Dear Welder Series…

Do you know which of your weld in kits are compatable with a 61 Ford Falcon?

Thanks

The 56″ kit is the one to use in your Falcon, Gord.

Thanks for asking.
Paul Horton

Dear Welder Series…

I found your web site surfing and have been grinning since. I have a 1974 Opel Manta with some holes in the frame. I want to tub it out, not too much, but enough to run a 12″ wide slick.
I am not sure on how to measure the curves in the pieces I need, but I can make them out of carboard, label them, and send to you with some pictures. Unless you have an easier way for me to get the measurements to you?
I plan on getting the 58″ Mustang II front cross member kits, and more as I go.
Thanks for the great web site and the instruction videos, that helps guys like me so much. Not alot of money, can fabricate, but not sure on the technical measurements or set up, you guys make it a little easier.
Take care.
Phil

Phil, we like to see people grinning!
All of our frame curves, vertical and horizontal, are 4″ inside radius.  It will be far better to buy the curves that we stock than to have us make curves to match your frame.  You could make cardboard pieces for our stock curves and hold them up to your frame.  A 3 x 2 vertical curve will be 4″ inside radius and 7″ outside radius (4″ + 3″).  The 3 x 2 horizontal curve will be 4″ inside and 6″ outside (4″ + 2″).
I hope this helps.  Thanks for asking.
Paul Horton

Dear Welder Series…

I’m looking at your mustang II kits and I watched your video but I still can’t see if they will work with a full fendered ’31 ford coupe.  The upper control arms can’t go very far above the top edge of the frame for the fenders to mount properly. If I would lower the whole assembly it would raise the car front considerably. Do you have any suggestions?

You’re right, Gary.  A Mustang II does not work easily in a Model ‘A’ (or late 20’s/early 30’s Chevs either).  The upper towers and the upper arms themselves, as you point out, will interfere with the fenders.  The front mounted rack interferes with the splash apron under the rad shell, too.  My suggestion?  Heidt’s Superide or Kugel or TCI custom IFS.

Thanks for asking.  I hope we can help with other parts for your project.

Paul Horton

Dear Welder Series…

Hi.  Saw your posts and great reviews on the HAMB.  I am finally getting back to work on a project that has been 14 years in the making.  I’m going to be 30 next year, and I’d like to drive my truck before then.

I’d like to  fab a custom 4-bar tube axle suspension with coil-overs.  I’m going to be running an IHC 392 and borg-warner 3 speed.  The IH engine ways as much as a big block Chev.  I’d like to get my truck fairly low running 16″ wheels.  I have a friend who is a welder that will be helping me with the frame.  I plan to stick with leaves in the back, and will likely need to c-notch the frame and install ladder bars.
I’m wondering what you can supply or fabricate to help me with my project.  Any help/suggestions especially concerning the front axle would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks very much for your time.
Sincerely,
John

Thanks for asking about Welder Series parts, John.

There are generally 2 types of tubular front axles:
1.  A straight tube that is bent a each end to “drop” the center section.  The spindle/king pin boss is then welded into a notch machined into the end of the tube.  Often the king pin is locked in place with a set screw.  These axles are made for vehicles much lighter than your truck.
2.  The “Super Bell” style with cast or forged “S”-shaped ends welded into a “smile”-shaped tube center.  These axles are designed to be used with a transverse spring.  This requires a crossmember to mount the spring.  The IHC 392 oil pan might want the same space as the crossmember.

Unless you are really committed to the front axle/4-bar suspension, I’d like you to consider a Mustang II independent.  There are several reasons:
1:  The ride height can (must) be established before the crossmember is installed.  Your truck will sit at the height where you want it.
2:  The ride quality will be better than with the axle.
3:  Steering will be more precise than with the axle.
4:  Power steering is easy to add or install later, if you want it.
5:  You can scout out and work around “ambushes” like oil pan interference before you are surprised.
6:  The rack mounts are part of the crossmember so the steering gear will be in the right spot.
7:  The cost is about the same as a finished dropped axle system.  But the truck’s resale value will be higher with the Mustang II.
7+:  There are more reasons for considering a MII suspension for this type of project, but ultimately, the project is yours.

I’m a big fan of coil-overs and air bags (conventional or ShockWaves) for rear suspension systems because they have a designed ride height.  That is, the suspension brackets get set up knowing that the coil-over or air spring will be at a designed height when the vehicle is ready to drive.  We use a piece of 1″ square tube with holes drilled at the coil-over’s ride height when building a project because there is no guessing at how much the suspension will compress under load.  We are going to use a spring (or air pressure) to achieve that ride height after all the weight is on the suspension.  Leaf springs do not allow this flexibility.  Leaves have to be added or removed, or the arch has to be changed.  Lowering blocks can be used to lower the frame, but it is difficult to raise the frame if necessary.

I hope this information helps with your planning.

Paul Horton

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